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ALPHA MANNOSIDOSIS

Rules

The Society will not register the progeny of, or certify the Transfer of, any Belted Galloway Bull (including from Artificial Insemination or Embryo Transplant) that has not been certified Negative to an Approved Test for alpha Mannosidosis or is from a sire and dam that have both already been proved negative.

The Society will not register any Belted Galloway Progeny (including from Artificial Insemination or Embryo Transplant) that has not been certified Negative to an Approved Test for alpha Mannosidosis or is from a sire and dam that have both already been negative.

All Belted Galloways currently registered with the Society and being transferred must have their alpha Mannosidosis status declared on the Transfer Form.

Prior to the sale of any Belted Galloway female, the alpha Mannosidosis status of the animal shall be established by an Approved Test for alpha Mannosidosis, or by being bred from a sire and dam that have both been proved negative.

Prior to the sale of any positive alpha Mannosidosis Belted Galloway female(s), the seller shall provide to the Purchaser, a copy of the Galloway Cattle Society of New Zealand (Inc,) Acknowledgement of Purchase of Belted Galloway alpha Mannosidosis Positive Female(s) form.

The Society will not certify the transfer of any positive alpha Mannosidosis Belted Galloway Female unless a copy of the Acknowlegement of Purchase of Belted Galloway alpha Mannosidosis Positive Female(s) form, with the animal name(s), herd book number(s), tag number(s) and date(s) of birth filled in, and signed by the Purchaser, is povided to the Registrar.

Breeders are trusted to pull their own samples of hair from the switch of tail for testing. The Society retains the right to require the owner of any male or female Galloway, Belted Galloway or White Galloway to be tested for alpha Mannosidosis to ensure the integrity of tests.
Such testing will be paid for by the Society.

Explanation

Alpha Mannosidosis is a rare hereditary disease which occurs in Angus, Murray Grey and Galloway cattle. It is a simple autosomal recessive disease which means both parents need to carry the gene for the calf to develop the disease. An animal who has one alpha Mannosidosis gene from just one parent will appear clinically normal and not show any signs of disease. This animal will be a carrier of alpha Mannosidosis. An animal with two alpha Mannosidosis genes, one from each parent, will be clinically affected. It will show signs of head tremors, difficulty walking, aggression and failure to thrive. Most calves die shortly after birth or within their first year. Some are aborted during pregnancy.

The easiest way for the Galloway Society to minimise the disease in the New Zealand Registered Herd is to make sure that the parents do not carry the gene. If the bull is alpha Mannosidosis free, then his offspring will not develop the clinical disease, even if the cow is a carrier. To date the only bulls to carry the alpha Mannosidosis gene are in the Belted Galloway herds.

The alpha Mannosidosis test is relatively simple and cheap but it needs to be recorded with the Society so the results can be registered. The test uses hairs pulled from the tail. A positive bull should never be mated with another Galloway, although he is still a valuable animal as he can be used over dairy heifers and cows as an easy calving sire. Dairy cattle do not carry the alpha Mannosidosis gene so the disease will not be expressed. If both the dam and sire are alpha Mannosidosis gene carriers, there is a 25% chance that the calf will be clinically affected and die, 50% chance the calf will be a carrier and perfectly healthy, and a 25% chance it will not carry the gene at all. If just one of the parents carries the gene, there is a 50% chance the calf will also be a carrier.

Alpha Mannosidosis is a rare disease that the Galloway Society is trying to eliminate from the national herd. For a small cost, testing your entire breeding herd is recommended, giving you peace of mind about the disease carrier status of your herd.NZ Galloway - Salisbury Stud
Salisbury Stud

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